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Master Class: Making Faces – Chris Landreth – Part 3

Well, it’s been quite a while since the last post, I’ve had very busy days but I have found time to write another part in the series of Making Faces.

On the third day, It was about the most important facial muscles, the way they work and their place on the face. Chris pointed out that there are many many more muscles on our face that allow us to make facial expressions, but he just gave us a small list of the ones that have more influence in each shape we can create with our face. In the end of the class, he let us a brief homework, which was make a map of all of those muscles and draw them in our own face, so we have a direct reference on what muscle does what. Here it is and just below a short description of each one:

Both images are the same, except one has names and a little sketch of where they actually are on the face and the other one is clean, so you can see the face. Some are funny 🙂 and the last one is a relaxed/expressionless face… just to compare.

1- Frontalus: Its function is to rise de eyebrows. It can be pulled in 3 different parts by some people, which let them rise onle one brow.

2- Corrugator Muscle: Located in the globella. It pulls inwards and make the face look angry.

3- Levitor Palpabre: Makes blinking possible. It can be in normal state, relaxed when the eye is closed and tensioned when it shows more eye blanks.

4- Orbicularis Oculi: It is not attached to the skull so it only floats in with the skin, and it works for squinting the eyes.

5- Alaeque Nasi Labius Superiors: It makes wincing faces.

6- Labius Superior: It pulls upside and it can be tensen just one side. When only this muscle is pulling, there’s no deformation on the nose or the bridge of the nose.

7-Zigomatic Mayor: It’s the main smiling muscle. It pulls upwards and to the sides and create a bulge on the cheeks.

8- Boccinator: When eating, it helps to keep the food in the mouth.

9- Triangularis muscles: Make the frown face.

10- Lower Lip Muscle: Makes the SSS sound

11-Mentalis Muscle: Helps to make the frown face by pulling the lower lip.

12- Incisivus Muscle: It makes the kissy face.

13- Risorius Platysma: Creates great tension in the neck and pulls the corners of the mouth down.

14- Orbicularis Oris: Can push out the lips as in “sh” sound, bend the mouth inwards as in “p”, and lip locking and tight lips.

This is a really light description of each muscle but it is best if you see it by yourself in the images or even better, on a mirror by yourself.

If  you have any questions, please make them below.

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Master Class: Making Faces – Chris Landreth – Part 2

Well, the first day on the Master Class, talking about Monday, was about getting to know the human head, the structure, the proportions, the bones that give that particular shape.

The first thing Chris said about facial animation was that it has to do with anatomy, mood and psychology. So it could be very complex, but fortunately everyone of us have developed a way to recognize facial difference, and it’s so important in our lives that the part of our brain that recognize faces is almost as big as the part that recognize everything else.

The focal point in this first lesson was that Chris give us a quick drawing assignment between 5 and 20 minutes with a reference that he took with his camera from one of the attendants and after we make our best effort, he corrected us based on what we had drawn. This method was better in comparison to when they first teach you how and then you try to imitate it, because this let you really put down your inner conceptions about things and then he corrects over what you’ve got. I don’t know if it would apply to other subjects, but particularly on this one was great.

So, for the first drawing, he asked for someone to be our model, and took a picture of him which later displayed on a projector, so everybody could see it. We have like 20 minutes, Chris drew as well. I felt really rusty on life drawing, so the warm up was really slow. This is my first drawing:

From this first approach to human head anatomy we learned that the eye line is set on the middle of the head from the hair line to the chin on most of us. Also the face can be divided in three parts, the first one ends almost on the eyebrows and the second on the base of the nose. And the eye width can be fitted 5 times on the human head. Fortunately, I wasn’t that bad after this first try, but something that Chris pointed out was that most of our drawings were outlines of the face features, and that we need to start seeing things as 3d shapes, that has volume and that interconnects one to each other.

Then we move up to the next assignment.

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Animation Scout – Animation Videos

There are few videos on the Internet that have great quality and accurate information on them about animation, but  as I wonder through many sites and posts, I stumbled upon a series of videos that have specific tips that are great to know when animating a character.

They include Eye Direction and it’s meaning, Eyelids: how they work, Head Direction: how do we can make our character look in a certain mood, Blinks: when and how to use them, Mouth Corners: how to use them and Eye Movement: How the entire eye moves when looking in different ways.

There’s no need to say that the one who made this videos, Ugur Ulvi Yetiskin, is a really talented animator

Here is one example:

And you can see the rest over here